Thankfully, we have not had a major hurricane in the Homestead/South Dade area for 10 years!

The 2017 Hurricane Season is coming up and it is time to review your plan!

Make sure you are self-sufficient for three days!

Now is the time to prepare!

2017 Hurricane Plan for the Congregation
If you want to download the Hurricane Plan use this link. If you want to look at the plan see below.
Hurricane Master Plan for 2017.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [336.9 KB]

7

St. Andrew's Lutheran Church

Hurricane Plan for 2017

 


ST. ANDREWS LUTHERAN CHURCH

2017 HURRICANE PLAN

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Principles, Stages and Steps ........................................................................... 3

Hurricane Preparation Checklist ...................................................................... 4

Supplies in Advance of a Hurricane ................................................................ 6

Making a Family Plan for Emergencies ........................................................... 7

Making a Disaster Supply Kit ........................................................................... 8

Evacuation ....................................................................................................... 9

Hurricane Preparedness Guidelines for the Elderly ....................................... 10

Disaster Preparation for Families with Special Needs..................................... 13

Children’s Issues............................................................................................. 15

Pet Safety ....................................................................................................... 16

St. Andrew’s Preparation Plan …………………………………………………….17

PRINCIPLES, STAGES AND STEPS

PRINCIPLES

The role of the church in disaster response is the following principles:

  • The church has a role to play in the emergency response.
  • The church must be the church in every aspect of its response.
  • The response to the disaster must be local.
  • The needs of victims come first.
  • Good and redundant communication is essential in disaster response.
  • The needs following a disaster extend over a longer period of time than the contributions.
  • As the disaster response progresses, the church must look beyond recovery.

STAGES

Inter-Lutheran Disaster Response identifies five stages of disaster planning and response.

  1. General planning.
  2. Specific planning in the event of a threat.
  3. Emergency/Rescue - both during and after a catastrophe.
  4. Relief - which usually begins anywhere from 24-72 hours after a disaster, but in some cases may not begin for up to two weeks.
  5. Recovery - the rebuilding process.

STEPS

The preparedness activities selected fall into four major steps:

  1. Establish a disaster preparedness committee.
  2. Ensure that congregation members are prepared if disaster occurs in your area.
  3. Together with your pastor and church council, make advance commitments to help others in time of need.
  4. Coordinate your activities with your local community, both in advance and in the aftermath of disaster.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NO CONDITIONS SHOULD THEY RISK SAFETY OR THE SAFETY OF FAMILY OR OTHERS REMINDED THAT UNDER TO CARRY OUT PERCEIVED RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE EVENT OF A SPECIFIC THREAT OR DURING THE EMERGENCY/RESCUE STAGES.

HURRICANE PREPARATION CHECKLIST

DURING A HURRICANE WATCH:

  • Check the first-aid kit                               
  • Check meds and prescriptions
  • Gather important documents                  
  • Fill your vehicle with gas/diesel
  • Ensure you have cash on hand            
  • Fill/get propane for grill, if in plan
  • Check food, supplies and water            
  • Check radio, flashlights and batteries
  • Secure yard items.  Do not put at curb as they may not be picked up before hurricane and can become deadly flying objects.
  • Pay attention to the instructions of local officials.  They are acting in your best interest.

DURING A HURRICANE WARNING:

  • Secure all doors and windows               
  • Fill clean containers with water for drinking
  • Turn fridge and freezer to maximum     
  • Fill containers with water and put in freezer
  • Sanitize bathtub and fill with water       
  • Cover furniture and valuables with plastic
  • Place the following a in large waterproof bag or plastic container:
    • Insurance policies and other important papers,
    • blanket and pillow,
    • large towel/wash cloths/paper towels,
    • change of clothing,
    • insect repellent,
    • detergent and soap,
    • trash bags.
  • DO NOT DRAIN YOUR POOL if you have one.
  • DO turn off electricity to all pool equipment.
  • If taking down TV antenna, unplug your set to make sure it is not electrically charged.
  • If you have a small boat (trailer size), put the boat on the ground, remove the motor, lash boat down and fill half full with water.

AFTER HURRICANE:

  • Pay attention to the instructions of public officials.  They are acting in your best interest.  Avoid electric shock - don’t touch fallen or low hanging wires under any circumstances.
  • Stay away from puddles having fallen wires near or in them.
  • Don’t touch any tree or object in contact with or near power lines.
  • Beware of weakened roads, bridges, tree limbs and porches that may collapse.
  • Use telephone for emergencies only.
  • Call to report hazards such as “live” power lines, broken gas or water mains or overturned gas tanks.
  • Do not call to report interruptions in electric, gas, water or telephone services.  Utility companies have plans for complete service restoration.
  • Continue to conserve refrigeration.  Check food spoilage after power is restored.
  • If putting up TV or CB antenna, beware of nearby power lines.
  • Be cautious when using emergency cooking facilities.  Fire-fighting will be difficult if water lines are damaged.

SUPPLIES IN ADVANCE OF A HURRICANE

  • Non-perishable foods (canned, dry foods, etc.)
  • Small amount of cash
  • First-aid kit
  • Flashlight (more than one) and correct sized batteries
  • Battery/solar/dynamo powered radio and correct batteries if required
  • Matches in waterproof container
  • One month supply of medications. Contact your doctor early so your pharmacy will have   a supply on hand for your advance purchase
  • Sanitary/continence supplies (toilet paper, adult diapers, etc.)
  • Personal hygiene products (feminine products, toothbrush, paste, deodorant, etc.)
  • Non-electric can opener that you can turn by hand
  • Empty containers you can fill with water. Allow at least one gallon of water per person per day, a two week supply is suggested
  • Soap and detergent
  • Paper towels, tissue and rubber gloves
  • Plastic bags for waster disposal
  • Insect repellent and sunscreen
  • Protective clothing and hats
  • Bleach without additives (for water purification purposes) or water purification tablets
  • Disposable eating utensils and dinnerware
  • Non-electric stove (optional) and fuel
  • Several coolers and ice
  • Extra pairs of dry socks and several pairs of comfortable shoes
  • Extra eyeglasses, contacts and hearing aid batteries
  • Umbrella and lawn chairs
  • Tarp or plastic sheeting (don’t forget stakes and rope)
  • Pillows and blanket
  • Phone list of family and friends
  • Cell phone battery(s), car charger
  • Cordless phone (if you have a landline, cordless will not work without power)
  • Important papers, including insurance policies (auto, life, home, windstorm, flood) Medicaid/Medicare cards, birth certificates, etc.
  • Pet food (if required)
  • Gas/fuel powered or solar powered generator
  • Fuel for generator and vehicle
  • Camera for insurance photos (film if required)
  • Spray paint
  • Axe, hatchet, saw and other tools
  • Duct tape
  • Rope
  • Baby food/formula (if required)
  • Rain/foul weather gear
  • Paper, pen/pencils, stamps
  • Non-latex disposable gloves
  • Tire repair/plug kit
  • Work gloves (leather)

MAKING A FAMILY PLAN FOR EMERGENCIES

EVALUATE

  • Identify potential threats in the community such as the location of flood prone areas, power plants and hazardous chemicals.
  • Discuss how natural and man-made threats could affect your family.  Evaluate your property’s vulnerability to hazards, such as storm surge, flooding, wildfire and wind.
  • Check your insurance coverage.  Flood damage, for example, is not covered by a homeowner’s insurance policy.  It must be purchased ahead of time to be applicable.

PREPARE

  • Check websites to get more information specific to your family’s needs.
  • Identify the safest are of your home for each threat.  In many circumstances, the safest area may not be in your home but elsewhere in your community.  During times of evacuation, you will be given instructions on evacuation routes.
  • Specify escape routes from your home and places to meet (rally points) such as a neighbor’s home, school or public location.
  • Make a plan for evacuating the area if required.
  • Designate an out-of-area contact (family or friend) so each immediate family member has the same single point of contact.  Try and have two means of communication (email, cell, landline).
  • Make a plan for your pets should you need to evacuate.  Most shelters will accept service animals.
  • Assemble and maintain a disaster supply kit.

MONITOR AND ACT

  • When a disaster occurs, listen to news sources for instructions and information.
  • Evacuate or seek medical attention quickly if authorities tell you to do so.
  • If you can get no information, determine as best you can if you are in a danger area.  Whether you stay or evacuate, don’t panic.  Follow your family plan.

MAKING A DISASTER SUPPLY KIT

            A disaster supply kit for your home, and for use during an evacuation, should include items in six basic areas:

  • Water, food,
  • first-aid supplies and medications,
  • clothing and bedding,
  • tools and emergency supplies and
  • important family documents.

            You will need the kit’s supplies if you are confined to your home, and they are valuable if you evacuate to a place other than a well-stocked shelter, or if you’re unsure of the shelter’s supplies.

TIPS FOR MAKING YOUR KIT

  • Keep items in airtight plastic bags.
  • Gather the kit’s items in easy to carry containers or duffle bags.
  • Put them within reach, near the exit you use most often.
  • Check and update your kit and family needs at least once a year.

TIPS FOR FOOD AND WATER

Water

  • A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water daily.  Heat and intense activity can double this amount.  Children, nursing mothers and those with special needs may require more.
  • Food preparation and sanitation require another two quarts per person per day.
  • Purchased bottled water that has been sealed is best for storage.  It meets FDA guidelines for food, is not as vulnerable to temperature changes as unsealed water, and has no shelf life.  (Some bottles have a expiration dates, but this is mainly for inventory control).

Food                                                                  

  • Choose compact, lightweight foods that do not require refrigeration, cooking or preparation, and foods that use little to no water.
  • If you must heat food, pack cans of chafing fuels such as Sterno.  Some MRE’s available for civilian use have heaters combined with the food.

EVACUATION

  • In your family plan for disaster and emergencies, map out your route to shelters or to locations out of the area.  Be familiar with alternate routes.  Remember local meeting places (often called rally points) and an out of town contact in case family members are separated.
  • If you have children in school, familiarize yourself with their emergency plans and where students are to be sent if an evacuation is announced.
  • Monitor news for instructions about evacuation.  If told to evacuate, do so quickly.
  • Follow evacuation route instructions.
  • Bring your disaster supply kit.
  • Keep your vehicle filled with at 1/2 tank of fuel at all times.  Never store additional fuel in your home, vehicle or shed.
  • If you don’t have a vehicle, plan another way to leave.
  • Lock your house.  Leave a note in a sealed envelope marked “emergency information” in an obvious location.  Include when you left, where you are going and contact numbers.
  • Check on the elderly, who may need your assistance and reassurance.
  • Enact your pet safety plan.      

If time allows:

  • Call or email your out-of-area contact about your plans.
  • If your home is damaged and you are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving.  Be familiar with the location of shut-off valves before a disaster.  If you turn off the gas, a professional must turn in back on.  Do not attempt to do this yourself.
  • Check with neighbors who may need assistance and/or rides.
  • If you are in an unfamiliar building, be aware of exit locations.  At work, know your office evacuation plan.

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS GUIDELINES FOR THE ELDERLY

 

WHAT ARE YOUR OPTIONS IF A HURRICANE APPROACHES?

 

PLAN A:        STAY AT HOME 

If you don’t live in an evacuation zone or a  manufactured mobile home, stay home and take these precautions:

  • Gather all supplies that you will need EARLY.
  • Establish a “safe room” in an interior room with no windows.  Bring needed supplies including radio, flashlight, medications, food and drinking water into this room.
  • Make sure that your home is secure and shuttered, and that it can withstand a hurricane.  Ask neighbors to assist with preparations if necessary.
  • Make sure that a neighbor or someone in your family knows that you will be there.
  • Let family and friends know you are staying at home.
  • Ask them to check with you after the storm.

PLAN B:        STAY WITH LOCAL FRIENDS

If you plan to stay with family or friends during a hurricane, take these precautions;

  • Call them in advance.  Make sure they will be ready for you.
  • Have a back-up plan in case they are out of town.
  • Have checklists outlining your needs.
  • If your loved one has dementia, ask to have room just for you and your loved one.  Ask them to take the same safety precautions you have in your home.
  • Bring your own food and water.

PLAN C:        RELOCATE OUTSIDE THE AREA

If you live in an evacuation zone, and/or a mobile/manufactured home you must relocate.

  • Leave early.
  • Have a full tank of gas and a current, easy to read map handy.
  • Know where you are going.  If you are going to a hotel, make sure that you have a reservation, as many hotels, even a hundred miles away, will fill up quickly.

PLAN D:        GO TO A SHELTER

  • If you plan on going to a shelter you may need to be prepared for an extended stay.  Take these precautions:
  • Make arrangements for pets early.
  • Red Cross shelters do not allow pets, only service animals.
  • Prepare supplies that you can bring with you (food, water, change of clothing, snacks, personal hygiene items, etc.)
  • Make sure the shelter you are going to is open and has space.  Listen to local media for updates and prepare early.
  • Bring your own cell phone, charger or spare batteries.
  • If you have special needs, you must pre-register with the Special Needs Program and meet the following criteria:
    • Oxygen dependent resident requiring electricity.
    • Insulin dependent diabetics requiring refrigerated insulin/supervised medical care.
    • Patients who are extremely immobile and/or have chronic stable illness, but are not suitable for a regular shelter.

SPACE IS LIMITED AND PRIORITIZATION IS BASED ON NEED

PUBLIC SHELTERS

              Red Cross shelters DO NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL CARE!  If you have special medical needs and require medical treatment, special care or are on electricity dependent medical equipment, you should contact your local emergency management office for guidance.

MIAMI-DADE EVACUATION SHELTERS

Robert Morgan Senior High       18180 SW122 Ave. Miami, FL 33177

Felix Varela Senior High            15255 SW 96 SW 96 St. W. Kendall, FL 33196

Jorge Mas Canosa Middle         15735 SW 144 St. Miami, FL 33196

South Miami Senior High            6856 SW 53 St. Miami, FL 33155

Terra Environmental Senior       11005 SW 84 St. Miami, FL 33173

PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS REGISTRY

            The people with special needs registry is maintained by each county’s office of emergency management to provide assistance to individuals with special needs who need to stay at public shelters.  People who need this special help often are elderly or have a physical disability, neurological or psychological disorder.  If you are unable to respond independently to an emergency situation which requires you to evacuate your home, you should register for assistance.  Register in advance.  If you wait until a storm is approaching, it will probably be too late to get the help you need.

IN-HOME SERVICE CLIENTS

            If you receive home health care or other in-home services that you depend on to live, discuss emergency plans with your agency representative.  Check with your physician, and if necessary, make arrangements now with a hospital to stay there if you must evacuate.  Hurricane shelters cannot help you if you depend on life support systems or advanced medical care.

WHEN A HURRICANE THREATENS

            When a hurricane is threatening, secure your home during a hurricane watch.  Continually monitor radio and/ or TV for announcements of shelter openings.  Eat before leaving home because meals may not be available for the first 24 hours.

WHAT TO TAKE WITH YOU WHEN YOU EVACUATE

  • Pack in a tote size bag (that you can carry)
  • Medications (at least 2 weeks supply) and list of medications you take and how often
  • Personal hygiene items and special foods
  • Identification and valuable papers (registration forms, insurance papers, Social Security
  • card Medicare/Medicaid cards, etc.)
  • List of names and telephone numbers of your doctor, clinic, pharmacist, family   members, friends, etc.
  • Change of clothing.
  • Blanket, sleeping bag or collapsible lawn chaise lounge chair
  • Food that does not require refrigeration, enough for 1-2 weeks
  • Bottled water, One gallon per person per day
  • Battery/solar/dynamo powered radio
  • Flashlight(s)
  • Appropriate batteries for flashlight and radio

 

Contact Information for

Special Needs

Miami-Dade office of Emergency Management

305-468-5400

The Alliance for Aging, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties

305-670-6500

Registrants must bring all required medical supplies and equipment to the shelter and should be accompanied by a caregiver, as the volunteer medical staff will be unfamiliar with your medical condition and treatment. The Division of Emergency Management will make every effort to assist anyone who needs transportation but primary responsibility in getting to the Special Care Unit (SCU) lies with the individual.

Following a hurricane, SCU occupants will not be released until their homes are determined to be safe to return to.  The American Red Cross and the Florida Dept. of Children and Families will care for you if your home is destroyed or rendered unsafe.

Any information you provide to the Division of Emergency Management and the Health Dept. will be used only to provide for your care during a major emergency.  The information you provide is confidential and protected by Florida law. If you have question, call the Division of Emergency Management.

DISASTER PREPARATION FOR FAMILIES WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

            Those who have family members with special needs must take extra measures to ensure their preparedness.  The following suggestions are from the American Red Cross and FEMA.  Families with special needs must carefully assess their options.  They should ask themselves the following questions:

  • Can we manage the entire needs of our family for three days with little or no outside assistance?
  • Can we meet any crisis or emergency on our own for that period of time?
  • Can we make decisions concerning our special needs without consultation or help for three days?
  • Do we have the supplies and equipment to meet our special needs for three days?

If the answer to any of the above questions is “no”, families must seriously consider evacuation from their homes in the event of a disaster.  Advance preparation should include how to evacuate and where to relocate.  Many areas have special needs shelters that are equipped with medical staff and specialized equipment.  In your preparation, check the shelters in your area and become familiar with their locations, procedures and policies concerning how many people are allowed to accompany the family member with special needs.

For more information about shelters, call your local Red Cross office.  Contact your local emergency management office to pre-register for a special needs shelter.

HOW SHOULD I CARE FOR A LOVED ONE WITH DEMENTIA/SPECIAL NEEDS?

  • Keep calm.  Your loved one will take cues from you and sense if you are panicked.
  • Ask you physician to prescribe medications to be kept on hand for emergency situations.  These would be medications to decrease anxiety and promote sleep.
  • Monitor your loved one’s level of anxiety and agitation.  Continue to reassure.  Realize that they may not understand what is going on.  You may need to administer the emergency medication if you notice that anxiety or agitation is increasing.
  • If you or your loved one has special medical needs (oxygen, insulin or IV therapy) pre-register with the special needs shelter.  Dementia is not considered special needs for these purposes.
  • Make sure he or she wears an identification bracelet.
  • Let family and friends know if you are leaving your home and where you are going to be during the storm.
  • If you go to a shelter:
    • Observe safety precautions such as limiting access to exits from the building or access to sharp items.
    • Be aware of people interacting with your loved one, as strangers and the unfamiliar environment may easily agitate your loved one.
    • Choose a quiet corner if possible.
    • Pack incontinent supplies and disposable cleaning cloths, if necessary.
  • If you stay home:
    • Try to enlist people to stay with you.
    • Keep rooms well lit - shadows and darkness add to confusion.
    • Lantern style flashlights are preferable to spotlights, which will create more shadows.
    • Minimize outside noise by closing curtains and doors to rooms with windows that face outdoors as the sounds of wind, rain and flying debris can be particularly terrifying and confusing.

SUPPLIES TO CONSIDER FOR SPECIAL NEEDS INDIVIDUALS

  • For respirators, oxygen concentrators and other electric dependent medical equipment make arrangements with your physician or check with your oxygen supplier about emergency plans.
  • Have on hand a two week supply of disposable supplies such as dressings, nasal cannulas, suction catheters, etc.
  • Have on hand a two week supply of both prescription and over the counter medications.
  • Electrical back-up for medical equipment
  • Copies of prescriptions for medical equipment, supplies, medications (ask your physician or pharmacist about proper storing of prescription medications)
  • Extra contact lenses and supplies, extra eye glasses
  • Extra batteries for hearing aids, communication devices, etc.

CHILDREN’S ISSUES

  • Assemble a kit for your children.
    • Favorite books,
    • crayons and coloring books,
    • several favorite small toys,
    • board games, playing cards, puzzles,
    • favorite blanket or pillow,
    • pictures of family and pets and
    • other items that will comfort children.
  • Children’s fears can stem from their imaginations, and adults should take these feelings seriously.  Words and actions can provide reassurance to a child who feels afraid.  When talking to your child, be sure to present a realistic picture that is both honest and manageable.
  • Be aware that after a disaster, children most fear that they will be separated from family, the event will happen again, someone will be injured or killed and they will be left alone.

Here is some advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics on communicating with children about disaster.

  • It is important to communicate to children that the family circle is strong. Children need to be assured by their parents that the family is safe. Adolescents, in particular, can be hard hit by any type of disaster. Parents may watch for signs such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, lack of pleasure in activities previously enjoyed, and illicit substance abuse.
  • Overexposure to the media can be traumatizing. It is best not to let children or adolescents repeatedly view footage of traumatic events. Children and adolescents should not view these events alone.
  • Adults need to help children understand the emergency or disaster. Discussion is critical. Explain it to your children in a simple way.

PET SAFETY

The following pet safety information has been compiled in cooperation with the Red Cross.

  • Have a safe place to take your pet.  Red Cross shelters cannot accept pets because of health and safety regulations and other considerations.  Service animals are the only animals allowed in Red Cross shelters.  It may be difficult to find shelter for your animals in the midst of a disaster, so plan ahead.
  • Contact hotels and motels outside your immediate area to check policies on accepting pets and restrictions on number, size and species.  Ask if “no pet” policies could be waived in an emergency.  Keep a list of “pet friendly” places, including phone numbers with other disaster information.
  • Ask others outside your area whether they could shelter your animals.  Also, prepare a list of boarding facilities and veterinarians who could shelter animals in an emergency.  Include 24-hour phone numbers.  Ask local animal shelters if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets during a disaster.  Animal shelters may be overburdened caring for the animals they already have, so this should be your last resort.

ASSEMBLE A PORTABLE DISASTER SUPPLY KIT

  • Keep items in an accessible place and store them in sturdy waterproof containers that can be carried easily.  Your pet disaster supply kit should include:
  • Medications (prescription and over the counter)
  • Medical records/vaccination record
  • First-aid kit
  • Sturdy leashes, harnesses, and/or carriers big enough for you pet to stand up and turn around.
  • Pet beds and toys, if easily transportable
  • Current photo of pet
  • Food and drinkable water for three days, bowls and can opener if needed
  • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and name and number of veterinarian in case you have to foster or board animals

LARGE ANIMALS

Owners of large animals such as horses, cattle should prepare an animal safety plan according to specific needs.  Talk to your veterinarian or animal handler, and check online resources for more information.

WEB SITES

www.avma.org - American Veterinary Medical Association

www.floridadisaster.org - Pet preparedness

 

Where to find us:

St. Andrew's Lutheran Church
1955 N. Krome Avenue
Homestead, FL 33030

Phone: (305) 247-6544

Fax:  (305) 247-6544

 

Email:

officemanager_salc@bellsouth.net

 

Facebook:

St. Andrew's Lutheran Church in Homestead

 

Twitter:

@salc_homestead

What's New

Please Join Us

Join us for our Worship Services and other Events on the calendar on the left.